Tag Archives: tutorial

Painted Tree Fabric Giveaway

I’m learning to use my hand and arm again but I had no idea it would be such a challenge. I’ve always said making art is my therapy but now it is literally my physical therapy!

I enjoyed painting this tree fabric but I wasn’t sure what I would do with it so I decided to give it away. The fabric is 100% cotton and measures approximately 17 3/4″ x 16 3/4″ and it’s been washed (no soap) and pressed dry.

If you are interested in a chance to win this painted tree fabric follow the rules below. If you know anyone you think may be interested in a chance to win this fabric, feel free to share this post and video.

Sweepstakes/giveaway begins April 14, 2021 and ends at 9pm (Pacific Time) April 26, 2021.

To enter: You must live in the US only (no international entries). One entry per person. Leave a comment that you would like to win the Painted Tree fabric and include your first and last name (or last initial).

On April 27, 2021 I’ll use a random drawer and announce the winner/s on my next blog post. Winner will email me their mailing information and I will mail the ­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­­Painted Tree fabric ASAP. PLEASE NOTE – If I don’t hear from the winner within five days of drawing date, I will run another random draw. Good luck!

Easy Additions

In the past when I presented live lectures to quilt guilds, one of the talks was about making the quilt more our own. We often use one main fabric to help select the other fabrics in a quilt, this is a twist on that. During my recovery ironing is not happening so please excuse any wrinkles.

Here are some examples of commercial fabrics with easy additions.

Above is a pretty floral fabric and nice black on white. With the addition of a stamp the black/white becomes a coordinating fabric and there’s more to quilt around.

The stamp was made by cutting thin craft foam into leaf shapes and gluing them onto scraps of Lauan (Sometimes I use Masonite and even cut-up sturdy box cardboard for stamp base and handle). Then I scored down the center of the leaves for added interest. Next I placed the fabric on a slightly cushy surface. Using a makeup type sponge, I applied craft acrylic paint onto the leaves, then stamped the leaves onto the fabric.

Another floral fabric needed something more vibrant so I used my Sharpie Stained markers. So simple and fun. Notice on the right side, even the addition of just a few orange dots make this fabric more lively.

Sometimes the fabric combinations are unexpected.

Jacquard Textile Color in apple green and a paint brush made specifically for applying paint to fabric.

Here the gingham inspired the squares for the stamp which was made using a thick craft foam. The paint is Jacquard Textile Color in Fluorescent Yellow.

Another floral fabric and a three leaf stamp on gingham.

Below, this beautiful jewel tone design on black fabric has so much potential, both with coordinating and customizing. The blue coordinating fabric inspired this next stamp and I love the look on the polka-dot fabric.

The last and simplest idea… To softens the dark/jewel tone fabric I pulled in a cream floral and used craft acrylic paint and a new flat pencil eraser.

The orange dots added just enough kick of color to make the subtle fabric work better with the darker.

Hard to tell here but the color of the cream fabric actually is in the dark fabric.

As I revisit these pieces it really gets my creative juices flowing. I hope these examples sparked some ideas in you.

Painting Fabric Pinwheels

I rarely make patriotic art but I wanted to make pinwheels using fabric and paint and since the 4th of July is approaching this turned out to be one of those rare occasions.

I reached for the Terial Magic spray stabilizer. It worked great, making the fabric behave like paper. Here is the finished piece and the step I took to make the pinwheels…

I like how the pinwheels seem to be lifting the pot off the ground like a hot air balloon!

I started by treating white fabric with Terial Magic and cutting three inch squares.

Apply star stickers (I made these) to treated white fabric.
Use a sponge and acrylic paint, dab over the entire surface.
Let dry (it dries quickly) and remove stars (if the stars are still sticky save for other projects).
Cut a wavy line through card stock to make the stencil.
Flip the square over and use another color paint and a sponge to dab just to one side of the stencil (for a less formal stripe).
For a more formal stripe – after cutting a curvy line in the card stock, tape the two pieces together leaving a 1/4″ gap.
Once the piece is dry fold it in half diagonally, open out and fold the other direction corner to corner again.
Now cut from the outside corners to a little past half way up on each creased line.
Bring every other corner up to the center.
I apply a piece of tape to hold while I get the thread and needle ready.
Use a needle with a double length of thread and remove the tape.
Start on the back side in the center and push the needle and thread through to the front. I like to use a thimble to help push.
Catch each point in a clockwise fashion and pull thread tight. Stitch through to the back and come up again to secure.
Grab the button and stitch it on, then flip to the back and tie off the thread.
And we have made a pinwheel!

I can imagine these being painted for many occasions or used to decorate a room. They would be fun to make with kids and glue could be used instead of needle and thread.

If you make fabric pinwheels I love to see your creations!

Heart Art: A Tutorial

I thought I would take a little break from my deadline work and play a bit. I’m not usually a heart art kind of person but this was fast and fun. I’ll leave it to you to think up ideas of where the finished heart could be used… maybe a tiny art quilt, on a fabric purse or tote, or simply framed? If you try it, I hope you’ll let me know what you did with the finished heart. (I apologize for the blurry photos but I’m sure you will be able to get the just of the process).  I love Neocolor ll wax pastels and that is what I used.

heart 1
Start with four pieces of freezer paper the exact same size.
heart 2
Iron three of the pieces together so that the paper side is out (like a freezer paper sandwich), then iron the fourth piece of freezer paper to the other three. Be sure they are lined up well so the freezer paper doesn’t melt onto the iron.
heart draw cut
Next fold regular paper and cut out a heart shape pattern. Then place the pattern on the freezer paper and draw around the heart.
heart draw design
Use a black marker to draw around the heart and then draw a free-style design inside.
bare needle
I removed thread, bobbin and presser foot. You may want to use a free-motion/darning foot but I prefer an open/bare needle. Be very careful if doing it this way.
bare needle stitching
Use a needle that will not be used on fabric ever again. Place the freezer paper heart under the needle and start stitching on the lines. I like to go fast and as you can see I didn’t follow the lines very well and that is just fine. If you go slowly it is easier to stay on the lines but for this project it doesn’t matter.
stitching finished
Cut the freezer paper heart out. This doesn’t need to be perfect unless you would like an even edge.
flip the heart
After all the stitching is done flip the heart over, notice this side is more textured than the other so this is the side to do the rubbing on. Place a piece of cotton fabric over the heart.
heart under fabric
Neocolor ll wax pastels may be used on fabric with water and other liquids and then heat set.
heart rubbing
Hold the fabric while using the wax pastels and rub across the fabric over the heart. I used one color inside and another around the outside edge.
rubbing done
When the rubbing is finished (there will be another rubbing later) removed the heart (this freezer paper heart could be colored and used in another piece of art). Place the fabric on a protected surface.
paint with water
Water and a soft brush used around the outside edge.
paint with water2
Start with only a little water and see how it bleeds before adding more. Notice how bright the pastel becomes.
paint with alcohol 1
Next do the same with rubbing alcohol on the center design. While water really causes the wax to bleed into the fabric, alcohol brightens it without causing it to move as much,
paint with alcohol 2
After the center is done I wadded a piece of foil then opened it out. Placed the foil under the fabric and used another wax pastel color for another rubbing.
heart foil rubbing
Wadded foil
heart foil rub painting
Another color.
heart art
A little more water wash on the blue and then air dry and heat set using an iron. I think it is calling for some quilting!

Doggy play day!

Sometimes it is good to just create something for fun – no rules and no deadlines! So I grabbed a greeting card my daughter designed years ago and used it to make a pattern for a little art quilt. Today I’ll post the first three steps and when it is finished I’ll post it again.

I used a piece of my hand painted sky fabric for the background.

slobbery prior to stitching
Fused no stitching (At this stage it looks like a polar bear to me)

I draw outlines on a piece of Sulky Super Solvy water soluble stabilizer and used KK 2000 temp spray adhesive. Then I free motioned sketched stitch the details.

slobbery prior to pastel
Stitched before wax pastel

Then using Caran d’ Ache water-soluble wax pastels, a paint brush and water, I added some highlights and shadows. I think I may hit the eye reflection with a dot of white textile or acrylic for a bit more spark.

My daughter says it’s better than her original but I like it just as much!

Watercolor washed rubbing…

You may have read on one of my earlier posts that we have leaves stamped into our patios and that I have used them as inspiration for some of my art.
Below are the steps to creating what will be a small art quilt OR a piece that could be incorporated into a larger piece. I used a piece of Pima cotton, watercolor (actually Jacquard Textile paints, thinned), water-soluble wax pastel, and bit of painted gauze.

step one
First lay the fabric on top of the imprint, hold securely or tape, and rub with the wax pastel almost parallel with the surface.

step 2

Next heat set it using a hot iron.

rubbing3

Using thinned textile paint, “wash” the paint color over the design.

rubbing4

I was trying to add more depth with the dark but did too much.

rubbing5
rubbing6

Luckily it dried much lighter and presented me with an opportunity to try and alter it by adding another layer – this time using painted gauze.

rubbing7

The gauze covered some of the dark areas and brought in another element and textured layer.

rubbing8
rubbing9

Because I’m pretty sure I’m going to quilt my pieces I like to add dots when painting the background, giving me something to quilt around.

I’m pleased with this piece and will post it again when it is finished.

rubbing top fin

I hope this gives you some ideas to try and I would love to see what you come up with!

Promises promises…

My husband and I celebrate our 35th anniversary this coming week and I guess that is why Valentine’s Day is no big deal to me (that and the fact that I should stay away from chocolate and our cat eats flowers and doesn’t keep them down).

Anyway, in keeping with the spirit of LOVE, I thought I would play a little with hearts. It started as a mono print and ending with questionable results but as always it was fun experimenting. For the last print pictured below I just stuck the contact paper hearts onto the plexi, rolled the paint covered brayer over them and placed the fabric on it. I’m sure if I had used the Gelli Arts print plate the results would have been better.

heart print materials 1
heart print materials 2
heart print materials setup
heart print plexi brayer
purpleheartslarge
Paint on plexiglass then brayed on materials
heart print first attemp
The back was better than the front but still not good…
heart print1
So print over it.

Note card from a quick cut stencil – tutorial

After having fun making fast cut stencils (see my video) I made a quilted card from one of the stenciled flower prints.

Fast stenciled & quilted card
Fast stenciled & quilted card
felt back before gluing to card stock
felt back before gluing to card stock

Using a pinking rotary cutter I cut out the stenciled design to my desired size (I wanted the finished card to fit into an envelope I already had). Next I cut out a piece of felt (this will be the batting) about 1/8″ larger than the stenciled fabric piece. I lightly sprayed the felt front with Sulky KK 2000 Adhesive, then centered and placed the fabric onto the felt. I took this to the quilting machine and free motion quilted where ever the designs sent me.

I used the envelope to determine the size to cut the card stock (fold before cutting) and centered the little “quilt”, then measured and cut the card stock. Next I used artist gel medium, spread on the felt back and placed it onto the card stock. I used hand pressure and rubbed, then left it to dry over night. The next day I had a lovely little gift card. The recipient could just display as is or add a mat and frame.

It was so much fun I know I will be making more!